2005 Acura Tl Review

2005 Acura Tl Review

2005 Acura Tl Review

ACURA TL 2005

The zenith of front-wheel-drive, high-performance luxury.

What’s new for the 2005 Acura TL: Both front airbags get an upgrade: the driver’s now deploys with less force if the driver’s seat is too far forward, and the passenger’s won’t deploy at all if the occupant weighs less than 65 pounds.

Ever since its early days as the Acura Vigor, the TL has always been a slightly slicker variation on Honda’s Accord. While basically still true, the differences have become more substantial over the years. The TL’s features are of a higher caliber (leather, heated seats, 5.1 DVD audio, xenon lights), it looks far more purposeful, and believe it or not, it’s much smaller now.

Setting it apart most of all is its emphasis on performance. At the start, the TL came with an outrageously powerful 270-horsepower V6 (later re-rated at 258), a firm suspension, and mean 17-inch wheels. Along with its obviously fast performance, the TL had quick, stiff steering and agile handling (and was available with a stick) — qualities even more abundant in the Type S model of 2007. Also impressive was the TL’s luxurious interior, especially given its bright, stylish presentation and the excellent tunes coming from its 5.1 surround sound DVD Audio system (the first in any automobile). No surprise that the TL has been Acura’s strongest seller for years.

But while the TL’s appeal hasn’t faded, its competition has been catching up on all sides. With the horsepower war in full swing, the TL’s advantage in speed has vanished. More substantially, the TL never had the natural-feeling handling that went with a rear-wheel-drive powertrain; it also lacks the now-common option of all-wheel-drive. The TL might still be one of the roomier cars, but there, too, the margin is shrinking. While we’re on the subject, its back seat could be better shaped.

Honestly, there ain’t much here that the Infiniti G35 can’t do better. But if for some odd reason you actually prefer front-wheel-drive, the TL is easily a more interesting car (and a better deal) than its main competitor, the Lexus ES350.

Best In Class Acura Clutch For Uncompromising Car Control

Best In Class Acura Clutch For Uncompromising Car Control

Best In Class Acura Clutch For Uncompromising Car Control

The clutch assembly installed on an Acura is an integral part of the car’s transmission system. It is responsible for controlling the transfer of torque from the engine to the drive wheels. Composed of a flywheel, clutch disc, pressure plate, and friction discs, the Acura clutch engages and disengages the gearbox depending on the input entered by the driver via the clutch pedal. When the clutch pedal is pressed, the pressure inputted is carried by a hydraulic pump called the clutch master cylinder to the clutch discs, which then engages the gearbox according to the pedal input. The metal friction disc then makes contact with discs and regulates the flow of torque to the drive wheels.

Such engagement and disengagement is what the Acura clutch is primarily designed for. Typically, an Acura clutch has more than one friction disc, with the discs pressed tightly together against the flywheel via the springs, to provide quicker launches and faster engagement. Acura clutch discs are lined with asbestos, the very same material used in brakes shoes and pads, to provide more friction during clutch operations. It enhances the grip between the flywheel and the disc. Normally, the Acura clutch uses the ceramic type of clutch discs for increased friction. A clutch with better materials and stronger springs will enable faster and smoother launches, quicker shifts, and durability.

Depending on the intended use of the vehicle, Acura clutch assemblies are categorized into two varieties: the performance and stock clutch systems. A stock Acura clutch assembly is composed of up to specs clutch friction disc and clutch pressure plate, with some Acura clutch kits sporting pilot bushings or pilot bearings to complement the high-traction friction material of the clutch. Performance clutch systems have a heat-treated steel finish to anticipate the harsh drive conditions of muscle, or performance, cars. The pressure plate holds the springs, cover and release fingers, which bind the clutch disc. Two types of pressure plates can be fitted on the Acura clutch, the diaphragm- and spring-type pressure plates. Another car contraption called flywheel can also complement the Acura clutch system, where the transmission is optimized for high performance, quick shifting and harsh engagement.