Top Hybrid Sport Utility Vehicles

Top Hybrid Sport Utility Vehicles

Top Hybrid Sport Utility Vehicles

The hybrid SUV has been around only for a few years despite a simple fact that many individuals are unaware of. The first electric vehicle was invented in the year 1900 by Ferdinance Porsche and the first hybrid electric vehicle appeared in the year 1901 as a means of extending the range and speed of a vehicle.

This first hybrid broke the world land speed record by achieving 50 km/h. However it would be nearly a century before the first widely accepted hybrid vehicle would appear.

Hybrid SUVs are a recent innovation that allow at a minim nearly double the fuel economy of their purely gas powered contemporaries. One of the first Hybrid SUVs from Ford the Escape was cited as being capable of performing at a thirty-eight mile per gallon capacity in the worst of New York City traffic.

The first Hybrid SUVs rolled off the car lots in 2008 and since then they have continued to actively improve in popularity. Unlike the lukewarm reception many hybrid vehicles acquire upon their release the idea of a sport utility vehicle with a V6 engine that has the fuel economy of a well designed V4 (better in some cases) gathers a lot of attention.

The Ford Escape mentioned previously mentioned has a fifteen gallon gas tank and was able to travel five hundred and seventy-six miles before it finally rolled to a stop due to lack of fuel.

The comparison with the former twenty-one mile per gallon rating was staggering as this vehicle was proven in the worst traffic imaginable to be capable of performing seventy-five percent better in regards to fuel economy compared to its standard gas predecessor.

This leads to an interesting choice at present due to the price point of the standard and hybrid SUV. A standard SUV can range from five to twenty percent cheaper overall than the hybrid version. However, the amount of fuel required to run the vehicle for a similar distance is nearly double.

At that rate if an individual were to spend one hundred dollars a week on gas for their standard SUV they would spend nearly five thousand dollars a year for fuel. The more expensive hybrid would require between thirty-percent to nearly half as much fuel as this.

If that same vehicle were to be used for a few years the amount of money spent on the vehicle would be eaten up via fuel cost expenditures. In the case of a vehicle where there is only a few thousand dollars difference then that first year will nullify any savings on the vehicle.

It is entirely possible that in a five to six year period of using the standard vehicle the amount of money spent on fuel in comparison to a hybrid SUV could be pooled together and used to purchase a new car outright without financing.

So the decision is before the consuming public. Do they wish to save money upfront and purchase a potentially more expensive vehicle to operate or will they purchase a more expensive vehicle and save on operating expenses?

Driving Substitute Vehicles

Driving Substitute Vehicles

Driving Substitute Vehicles

On most days, the world is straightforward. We get out of bed, eat breakfast, gently roll the vehicle out on to the road and start driving. But every now and again, the routine is disrupted and then the small print in your insurance policy takes on a new significance. Now you will really find out what you bought. As an example, let’s travel over to North Carolina where a family owned several vehicles. The husband usually drove a Toyota Sequoia but, on the fateful morning, his wife told him there was a possible problem with the brakes and she was taking it in for service. He therefore set off for work in the Mitsubishi Montero. He was hit from the rear and the vehicle rolled over, landing him in hospital and six months of rehabilitation before he was able to return to work.

The driver at fault only carried the minimum liability coverage of $30,000 and had no assets – he was not worth suing. But the policy on the Sequoia issued by the Companion Property and Casualty Insurance Company, carried losses of up to $1 million under an uninsured and medical payments policy. There was a provision giving coverage if the insured was driving a “temporary substitute auto”. On the face of it, this seems to cover driving the Montero. His usual vehicle needed repairs. The Montero was a temporary substitute. But, as is always the case, the insurer refused to pay. For something that looks obvious, this has generated several years of litigation. Starting in January 2005, we have been through three levels of court, ending in the North Carolina Supreme Court which did not reach a decision, but sent it back down to the original court for a full hearing on the facts. So, after almost six years, we are back where we started and no further forward.

This is yet another of those horror stories showing that attorneys and the courts they work in can tie a case up in knots for years without ever reaching a final decision. What’s interesting about this particular story is the extent to which an innocent buyer of insurance can end up the victim in the system. Here’s a man who owns two vehicles and, in good faith, he buys a policy that not only says it covers him when driving the nominated vehicle, but also when he’s driving a temporary substitute. Anyone looking at such a policy would imagine he was covered against all reasonable situations in which a claim might arise. Indeed, our policy holder has, from the start, alleged the insurer made the sale and subsequently acted in an unfair and deceptive way.

This leads us to two conclusions. Everyone should take the time to read all the terms of the policies offered, whether as full-price or cheap car insurance and, if there is any doubt in your mind as to the extent of the coverage, always ask specific questions. Secondly, if what you were told before you buy is later denied, get a good attorney who is prepared to fight for your rights. Get cheap car insurance and make the insurer pay!